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Gabriel Garcia Marquez's 'One Hundred Years of Solitude' Is Coming To Netflix

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Colombian writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (C) arrives for the 28th New Latin American Cinema Festival at the Karl Marx theatre December 5, 2006 in Havana, Cuba. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Netflix has announced they will be adapting Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Marquez's iconic "One Hundred Years of Solitude" into a series.

"This marks the first and only time in more than 50 years that his family has allowed the project to be adapted for the screen," the streaming service confirmed in a statement.

Variety revealed that the Nobel Prize-winning novelist’s sons, Rodrigo Garcia and Gonzalo García Barcha, will serve as executive producers on the series.

"For decades, our father was reluctant to sell the film rights to "Cien Años de Soledad" because he believed that it could not be made under the time constraints of a feature film, or that producing it in a language other than Spanish would not do it justice," Rodrigo Garcia explained in a statement.

"But in the current golden age of series, with the level of talented writing and directing, the cinematic quality of content, and the acceptance by worldwide audiences of programs in foreign languages, the time could not be better to bring an adaptation to the extraordinary global viewership that Netflix provides," he said.

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Colombian writer and Nobel prize in literature winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez died at aged 87 at his home in Mexico City, Mexico. (Photo by Miguel Tovar/LatinContent/Getty Images)

The book was first published in 1967 and it has since sold an estimated 50 million copies worldwide, the novel has also been translated into 46 languages.

Netflix has said they are dedicated to hiring the best Latin American talent and the series would be shot in Colombia.

Did you know that....

When Marquez died at age 87 in 2014, Colombia President Juan Manuel Santos declared three days of national mourning, and ordered flags to be lowered to half-staff across the country.